Arizona Water Resource

The AWR newsletter, published quarterly, provides news and features on state and regional water issues, as well as information on upcoming events, research, publications and other resources. 

Format: 2014-07-24
Format: 2014-07-24
Summer 2014
12 pps.
Water-related technologies developed in recent years are improving efficiency, treatment, utility operations and more. These technological advances have already had an impact on water use and point toward future innovations....more Table of Contents: Features
Spring 2014
12 pps.
On April 8, 2014, over 350 people from 49 Arizona communities gathered at the University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center for the Water Resources Research Center annual conference. Thirty-five speakers from the private and public sectors presented on the gap between water supply and demand, and how to close it. A poster session showcased research and initiatives relating to conference issues and provided an opportunity to celebrate the WRRC’s 50th anniversary... more Table of Contents:
Winter 2014
12 pps.
In January 2014, Arizona will begin its first farmland fallowing and forbearance project. Unlike similar fallowing programs in the West, this project does not transfer the water conserved in the agricultural sector to the municipal sector. For the time being, this program seeks to conserve water in the Colorado River system. The saved water will be maintained in Lake Mead, increasing its dwindling levels and helping forestall shortages to water users in the Lower Colorado River Basin. Since 2000, water levels in Lake Mead have fallen by an alarming 100 feet.
Autumn 2013
12 pps.
In the City of Prescott, the Watson Woods Riparian Preserve, along Granite Creek, is an oasis for wildlife and humans surrounded by development. The city’s wastewater treatment plant and transfer station are located a block to the east, a lumber company and a concrete block manufacturer are located to the south, Highway 89 and some dense subdivisions are to the west. Over the last century, this riparian area has been a sand and gravel mine, a dumpsite, a 4-wheel playground, and a shooting range.
Summer 2013
8 pps.
On Saturday, June 1, 2013, water was released from Elephant Butte Reservoir in South Central New Mexico into the Rio Grande. It took more than two days to travel the 80 miles to fields near Las Cruces, as water soaked into the parched riverbed. Waiting for the flow were chile, pecan, cotton and alfalfa growers in Southern New Mexico, Western Texas and Mexico, as well as the city of El Paso, Texas, which depends on the Rio Grande for half its water supply.
Spring 2013
12 pps.
The opportunity to hear expert presentations and discussion on the issue of water security attracted approximately 300 people to the WRRC’s annual conference, “Water Security from the Ground Up”. The audience represented more than 40 communities across Arizona.  
Winter 2013
8 pps.
In November 2012, five people were elected for the Central Arizona Water Conservation District. The CAWCD and its board members may not be well known to the general public, but they play an important role in Arizona water policy. The CAWCD manages, operates, and directs policy for the Central Arizona Project (CAP), the supplier of approximately 1.5 million acre-feet of water for Maricopa, Pinal, and Pima counties. This water is critical for the people of Central Arizona.
Winter 2012
12 pps.
Fungicide in orange juice, Arsenic in apple juice, Listeria in cantaloupe--these are the latest “food safety issues you care about” listed at foodandwaterwatch.org. But how important are these issues? The public can see Food and Drug Administration reports on all three by going to the FDA website. An outbreak of Listeria associated with contaminated cantaloupe caused 30 deaths in 2011, and concern continued in 2012 with an additional death and recalls of potentially contaminated fruit. Washing the fruit before cutting it might have lowered the death toll.
Summer 2012
12 pps.
In recent years, U.S. employers have been reaching out internationally in order to fill job vacancies in highly skilled science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. This situation has led to calls for better STEM education in the United States. Innovative educational initiatives have emerged to answer the call for more professional competence in these STEM areas. In his 2012 State of the Union address to Congress, President Barrack Obama again emphasized the need to interest and educate young people to become the scientists, engineers and mathematicians of the future.
Spring 2012
12 pps.
When the captain announced the plane’s descent, I put my book down and peered out the window as I always do. I saw sand dunes first, leading my eye to a small mountain range flanked by dirt roads and farm fields. The mountains framed successive basins, each with the same dry ground spotted with desert shrubs. After the next range, a city emerged. Densely packed buildings appeared beside finished roads. And the canals ran from the farm fields into the city, running full next to dry riverbeds. It looked a lot like Tucson.
Winter 2012
12 pps.
Global Water Brigades (GWB) is a program under Global Brigades, the largest student-led, non-profit, sustainable development organization in the world. Global Brigades works on a holistic model with disciplines in water, public health, medical, dental, architecture, environmental, law, business, and micro-finance. Students across the U.S., and around the world, start chapters at their universities to mobilize students in projects that empower rural areas in Honduras, Panama, and Ghana to improve their conditions...
Autumn 2011
12 pps.
“It’s a promise to be a good citizen of the world, protecting the Earth’s natural resources through innovation and more efficient use of land, energy, water and packaging in our operations.” – PepsiCo, on their environmental sustainability promise Environmentalists and corporations have not always seen eye-to-eye on matters of how our natural resources should best be used. In fact, many people see corporate industry as inherently anti-environmental. However, without industry, we would not be able to enjoy many of the comforts of modern day living.
Summer 2011
12 pps.
From May 2010 to March 2011, Reclamation conducted a pilot run of the Yuma Desalting Plant (YDP) and demonstrated its potential to augment lower Colorado River supplies. Over 30,000 acre-feet of irrigation return flow was recycled preserving a like amount of Colorado River water in Lake Mead, approximately the amount of water used by 116,000 people in a year.
Spring 2011
12 pps.
Water draws people together because water is life. However, when many people, animals, and industries are competing over limited water, things can get tense. Transboundary aquifers are sources of groundwater that defy our political boundaries and often lead to intense conversation about what should be done in order to give everyone a fair share.
Winter 2011
8 pps.
The field of hydrophilanthropy has been around for decades, although the term is fairly new. Hydrophilanthropy means different things to different people, depending on which end of the deal they are on. David Kreamer (who coined the term) promotes "a flexible, open minded approach to the description of hydrophilanthropy and its attributes, a definition that includes many diverse activities and practitioners who advance the sustainability of clean water in the world."
Autumn 2010
12 pps.
Novelist John Updike is taking a dim view of leadership when he asks in his novel, Rabbit is Rich, “How can you respect the world when you see it’s being run by a bunch of kids turned old?” The Water Resources Research Center conference was organized with a far loftier idea of leadership, at least in the water and environmental field.
Spring 2010
12 pps.
The water resource field is among those areas expected to benefit from nanotechnology, its application holding special promise for treatment and remediation; sensing and detection; and pollution prevention. That cuts a rather wide swath in the water resources field. The nanorevolution or movement is being met with both optimism and caution as scientists ponder how best to take advantage of its benefits and at the same time understand and reckon with its possible risks.
Winter 2010
8 pps.
Agriculture faces a conundrum: populations needing food are increasing and the necessary land and water resources to produce crops are not. What to do?
Autumn 2009
12 pps.
A community program that included keynote addresses rounded out the day's events on Sept. 1. University of Arizona's President Robert Shelton greeted about 225 people attending the community event. Ben Grumbles, director of the Arizona Department of  Environmental Quality, further  extended the welcome.  
Summer 2009
8 pps.
An increasingly frequent urban sight (although not in Arizona and the West) green roofs demonstrate a new meaning and purpose for roofs. Roofs, a hitherto taken-for-granted, inauspicious urban feature, are being adapted to take advantage of the natural elements of water, sun, soil and vegetation, to achieve environmental benefits. In the process a new word is coined: roofscape.
Spring 2009
12 pps.
Arizona has another Wild and Scenic River; Fossil Creek with it’s the travertine geological formations and crystal clear waters now shares the same protected designation as a segment of  the middle Verde River, the state’s only other Wild and Scenic River.        
November 1, 2008
8 pps.
It is no doubt a sign of the drought-struck times that efforts to strictly account for lower Colorado River water use are now focusing on individual landowners and homeowners who have drilled wells and pump water along the lower Colorado River. Up to now, efforts to regulate Colorado River water use have mainly been directed at the big water users: states, Indian nations and irrigation districts.
Autumn 2008
16 pps.
With desalination looming big on the water resource horizon, many water officials are looking at their options. One option Arizona officials are considering is building a desalination plant in Puerto Penasco that would be a joint Mexican-Arizona project, with both the resort community and the state benefiting from the desalinated water supplies. With desalination an emerging technology, other kinds of options will be available in the future. One such option is seawater desalination vessels, ships capable of onboard desalination for onshore use.
Summer 2008
12 pps.
How much water is needed to produce a hamburger? At one time this was not the type of question many water officials deeply pondered. They were more concerned with the amount of water used to irrigate a lawn or operate a washing machine than worry about hamburgers, sugar, milk, oils and vegetables as significant water-using commodities. This was food that could be purchased, served and consumed, with nary a flow, sprinkle or drip evident to disturb the most devote water-saving consumers and dampen their appetites. Now drought and water shortages have created stricter water accountability.
Spring 2008
12 pps.
Does it take a Crypto Creature to catch public attention and raise concerns about critical water issues citizens should know and care about? The Water Services Department of Bryan Texas found the approach effective in educating citizens about the threat of cryptosporidium in drinking water. Whatever else might be said of the strategy of relying heavily on the skills of a cartoonist, the message came readily across that the crypotosporidium pathogen is mean, nasty and dangerous, a pest best shunned.

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